You are here

Inquiry First.


The challenge of engaging students in STEM education took center stage at the National Press Club last week, where a diverse panel discussed the key issues and possible solutions.
Show original


With an unbridled fascination for all things science, Stefan Weitz, a senior director with Microsoft's Bing, makes geekdom cool.  He's one of Microsoft's "Heroes of STEMtember."
Show original


Science, technology, and innovation all play starring roles in the competition between countries for power in the new "knowledge economy."  Growth demands renewed focus on the area where education and the economy meet.
Show original

According to a new survey by Microsoft, the decision by students to pursue a STEM-related degree often happens in middle school or even earlier.
Show original


According to Dr. Ben Levin, "The U.S. cannot improve its education system for all or even most children by keeping its present focus on charter schools, more testing, teacher evaluation and union bashing. None of these feature in the best-performing countries."
Show original

By investigating such things as the pH and salinity of their local water, students from all over the world have the opportunity to contribute to what may be the biggest chemistry experiment ever.
Show original

 

Schools from around the country are finding creative, dynamic way to approach STEM education.  Intel chose 18 models of innovation and excellence as winners of its "Schools of Distinction" awards competition.
Show original

 

Blogger Emily K. Schwartz makes some interesting points in her post about opening doors into STEM fields for girls, who may not naturally be drawn to them.
Show original

Since the launch of Planet Hunters in December, 40,000 web surfers have helped in the search for new planets by crunching data collected by NASA.
Show original

It is the STEM workforce that drives the nation's innovation, progress and economic growth. Yet, employers struggle to find qualified candidates to fill STEM positions and with good reason - STEM workers made up only 5.5 percent of America's 2010 workforce. How do we bridge the gap between supply and demand of these workers?
Show original

Pages

Theme by Danetsoft and Danang Probo Sayekti inspired by Maksimer